Examining the Role of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) in Mexico (1973-2017)

05/21/2019 - 12:30pm to 1:50pm
Location: 
Social Science Research, Room 224

Mexican Studies Seminar | Spring 2019

Examining the Role of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) in Mexico (1973-2017)

Featuring:
Carlos A. Pérez Ricart
University of Oxford

In recent years, scholars have written extensively on the influence of the United States in Mexican drug policy. Unfortunately, and in spite of the many advances in the field, most of this literature has failed in providing a comprehensive examination of how specific U.S. law enforcement agencies have interacted with their Mexican peers in the design and execution of drug policy.

In this talk, Carlos A. Pérez Ricart examines the role of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) in Mexico over several decades (1973 to 2017) from both a historical and comparative perspective. More specifically, he assesses the activities of the DEA’s officials and agents in shaping Mexican drug policy during the period. He critically engages with the role of the agency in processes of institutional building, as well as with its participation in cases of human rights violations.

His research, which draws from archival research and interviews with former narcotic agents, contributes to the literature on drug policy, Mexican-US relations and transnational policing.

Carlos A. Pérez Ricart (1987) is postdoctoral fellow in the Contemporary History and Public Policy of Mexico at the University of Oxford. He is a member of both the History Faculty and the Latin American Centre (LAC). He holds a PhD in Political Science and in Latin American Studies from a Comparative and Transregional Perspective at the Freie Universität Berlin and has a degree in International Relations of El Colegio de México. His general research and teaching interests include the relationship between Mexico and the United States, security and organized crime, drug policies and state formation. He is currently conducting a research project which sets out to study the Mexican police. His research has been published (or is forthcoming) in journals such as Foro Internacional, Global Governance, Kriminologisches Journal, Frontera Norte, Revista Colombiana de Sociología, Contextualizaciones Latinoamericanas and Critical Reviews on Latin American Research. He recently coedited the book Después de Ayotzinapa: Crimen Organizado, Sociedad y Estado en México (2017, Tranvía Verlag).

Lunch will be provided for those who register in advance.

More information: 773.834.1987
mexicanstudies@uchicago.edu

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