Gender Studies

CSRPC & CSGS Year-End BBQ

Please join the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture (CSRPC) and the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality (CSGS) as we celebrate the end of the 2017-2018 school year.

We will have great food (with plenty of veg-friendly options), drinks, and music to welcome the summer. We will also be bidding a fond farewell to the visiting University of Puerto Rico students.

All are welcome!

Security Alerts Town Hall

Join the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality for a Town Hall meeting with University of Chicago’s Eric M. Heath, Associate Vice President for Safety and Security, and Bridget Collier, Associate Provost for Equal Opportunity Programs and Title IX Coordinator.

GSSW: Mariana E. Brandman, “New Voices on Tape, New Bodies on Stage: The Origins of Feminist Comedy, 1965-1976"

Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop

This quarter’s theme is “Alternative Archives,” curated by Chase Joynt (SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality). Workshops will focus on alternative approaches to archival work that often anchor interdisciplinary scholarship and creative pursuits.

May 29th: New Voices on Tape, New Bodies on Stage: The Origins of Feminist Comedy, 1965-1976
Mariana E. Brandman, PhD Candidate, Department of History, University of Chicago

CSGS Faculty Book Party

The Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality is grateful to our faculty affiliates from across departments, divisions and schools who generously contribute their time and energies to the Center and its continued development.

Please join us on Friday, May 18 as we take the evening to celebrate recent books by some of the CSGS’s amazing faculty affiliates including:

Celine Parreñas Shimizu, "Making the Compassionate Spectator: Annihilation and Affliction in the films of Brillante Mendoza"

Brillante Mendoza’s films immerse us in a hyper-real aesthetic of squalor with Filipinos who won’t stop trying to survive. I am concerned with formulating an ethical response to cinematic encounters across inequalities of authorship and spectatorship. When Brillante Mendoza refuses to give pleasure to the viewer, he forces us to question the basis of our identification with his images. Instead, the viewer must undergo self-destruction and trauma in a new form of watching and listening.