Department of Psychology

Chair Leadership Changing in Five Departments

 

On Thursday, May 31, 2018, Dean Amanda Woodward announced chair transitions in five of the division’s departments. The appointments are effective July 1, 2018.

 

Jennifer Cole will serve as chair of the Department of Comparative Human Development. Jennifer, a social and cultural anthropologist, examines how personal change and individual development shape, and are shaped by, broader political, economic and cultural transformations. She has been at the University of Chicago  since 2001. 

 

In memoriam: John Cacioppo (1951-2018)

Andrew Bauld, UChicago News Office

 

John T. Cacioppo, pioneer and founder of field of social neuroscience, 1951-2018

 

Prof. John T. Cacioppo, a pioneer and founder of the field of social neuroscience whose research on loneliness helped to transform psychology and neuroscience, died unexpectedly and peacefully at home on March 5. He was 66.

 

New UChicago podcast Knowledge Applied examines research of environmental neuroscientist Marc Berman

It’s no surprise that a little nature can go a long way in making people feel better. But the research of UChicago environmental psychologist Marc Berman shows that adding trees to a city can have a significant impact on a person’s health and happiness.

 

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NSF Integrative Strategies for Understanding Neural and Cognitive Systems (NCS)

The complexities of brain and behavior pose fundamental questions in many areas of science and engineering, drawing intense interest across a broad spectrum of disciplinary perspectives while eluding explanation by any one of them. Rapid advances within and across disciplines are leading to an increasingly interwoven fabric of theories, models, empirical methods and findings, and educational approaches, opening new opportunities to understand complex aspects of neural and cognitive systems through integrative multidisciplinary approaches.

Describing certain foods in a foreign language reduces aversion

Restaurateurs apparently know what they’re doing when they offer “escargot” on a menu rather than “snails.” New research shows that people are more willing to eat foods that they find disgusting if those foods are presented in a foreign language. That’s the conclusion of a recent set of studies co-authored by a UChicago postdoctoral scholar in psychology, which could help win acceptance for environmentally sustainable foods that many people are unwilling to try. Americans and Europeans are...