Department of Anthropology

NSF Research Coordination Networks (RCN)

The goal of the RCN program is to advance a field or create new directions in research or education by supporting groups of investigators to communicate and coordinate their research, training and educational activities across disciplinary, organizational, geographic and international boundaries.  RCN provides opportunities to foster new collaborations, including international partnerships, and address interdisciplinary topics.  Innovative ideas for implementing novel networking strategies, collaborative technologies, and development of community standards for data and meta-data are especia

NSF Law & Social Sciences (LSS)

The Law & Social Sciences Program considers proposals that address social scientific studies of law and law-like systems of rules.  The program is inherently interdisciplinary and multi-methodological.  Successful proposals describe research that advances scientific theory and understanding of the connections between law or legal processes and human behavior.  Social scientific studies of law often approach law as dynamic, made in multiple arenas, with the participation of multiple actors.  Fields of study include many disciplines, and often address problems including though not limited

NSF Cultural Anthropology Program

The primary objective of the Cultural Anthropology Program is to support basic scientific research on the causes, consequences, and complexities of human social and cultural variability. Anthropological research spans a wide gamut, and contemporary cultural anthropology is an arena in which diverse research traditions and methodologies are valid.

NSF Biological Anthropology

The Biological Anthropology Program supports basic research in areas related to human evolution and contemporary human biological variation. Research areas supported by the program include, but are not limited to, human genetic variation, human and nonhuman primate ecology and adaptability, human osteology and bone biology, human and nonhuman primate paleontology, functional anatomy, and primate socioecology. Grants supported in these areas are united by an underlying evolutionary framework, and often by a consideration of adaptation as a central theoretical theme.

NSF Archaeometry

The goal of the Archaeology Program is to fund research which furthers anthropologically relevant archaeological knowledge. In accordance with the National Science Foundation’s mission such research has the potential to provide fundamental scientific insight. While within the broad range of “archaeology” the focus is on projects judged to be significant from an anthropological perspective, the Program sets no priorities based on time period, geographic region or specific research topic. The Program administers four competitions each of which is described below.

NSF Archaeology - Senior Research

The goal of the Archaeology Program is to fund research which furthers anthropologically relevant archaeological knowledge. In accordance with the National Science Foundation’s mission such research has the potential to provide fundamental scientific insight. While within the broad range of “archaeology” the focus is on projects judged to be significant from an anthropological perspective, the Program sets no priorities based on time period, geographic region or specific research topic.

Rediscovering Dejima: My journey through early modern Japan’s window to the West

The little-known artificial island of Dejima often surprises people.  Though the “opening” of Japan to the West is popularly regarded as the arrival of American Commodore Perry’s steam-powered gunships at Tokyo Bay in 1853, Dejima proves Westerners were welcomed in Japan long before Perry.  Ever since I first learned of Dejima, I have been fascinated by this intriguing site that can expand our understanding of early global commerce from a non-colonial perspective.