Department of Anthropology

University of Chicago's Women's Board Grants Fund

Each January, the Women's Board announces a formal request for funding proposals which is disseminated to the University system. Students and Faculty are invited to submit grant proposals in March. A new Women's Board Grants Committee is convened each spring, by the Chair of the Board, to represent the Women's Board in determining grant recipients. The committee reviews all proposals received over the course of several weeks and determines finalists. In late April, over the course of two days, the committee hears presentations given by finalists.

‘Laughing Until it Hurts’: Media Circulation as an Organizing Process

My research focuses on the circulation of discourse around complaints that see ‘vulgar’ television comedy programming as a potentially negative social influence on youth in Japan. Such complaints frequently center the potential for schoolchildren to imitate (mane) comedic routines and speech without fully appreciating the social impact on those around them.  Such discourses argue that what appears as a funny teasing imitation to some may actually become painful bullying (ijime) in the experience of others.

Unsettling Presents, Indigenous Futures: Politics and Mobility on the Northwest Coast

It takes about six hours to take the ferry from Prince Rupert on the northwest coast of British Columbia to the island archipelago of Haida Gwaii, the sovereign territory and home since time immemorial of the indigenous Haida Nation. It’s a ride with something of a reputation for nausea, as the Hecate Strait over which the ferry passes is well known for being shallow, difficult to navigate, and prone to storms. All stomach discomfort aside, though, it’s a ride that is special for me.

Goroka: The Shared Account in Assam’s Kingdom of Magic

My dissertation, tentatively titled “Goroka: The Shared Account in Assam’s Kingdom of Magic,” investigates how, why, and in what ways emergent political and economic relationships and the forces mobilized in coincidence with them have become new sources of (and perspectives on) both prosperity and intersubjective memory in Assam—a state in India’s northeastern periphery beleaguered by so-called “ethnonationalist” violence.

Telescopic Nationalism in Post-Socialist Mongolia

I set out to look for cultural nationalism, focusing on three sites that as expected revealed a rich variety of manifestations. I specifically examined expert cultural practices (Mongolian calligraphy), national spectacles (Naadam), and projects of cultural and religious revival (Buddhist, semi-Buddhist and others). What I found has profoundly affected my understanding of how nationalism can work.

Politics on the Hoof: Exploring Late Bronze Age Food Production and Political Organization

In recent years, it has become very clear that food is a political matter. Food deserts, GMO crops, ‘organic’ and ‘natural’ labeling disputes, various ‘slow food’ movements, and even recent controversies over the ethics of eating quinoa have brought the political dimensions of the simple, everyday act of eating to the forefront of the contemporary moment. This strong connection between food and politics is not limited to the present or even to recent history. The production, distribution, and consumption of foods always have political implications and impacts.

Wine Made in China: An Experiment of Industrial Agriculture and Transformation of Farmland Ownership

Whenever I explain about my research topic to American friends, they are usually surprised by the fact that wine is actually produced in China. As a matter of fact, China is now the sixth largest producer of wine by volume, surpassing Chile and Australia. Since the early 2000s, the Chinese government has been promoting the wine industry as a model of rural development and agricultural industrialization. Supported by local governments, major wine companies are expanding their vineyards by leasing farmland from village collectives and employing villagers as contract farmers.

Russell Sage Foundation Awards

The Russell Sage Foundation was established by Mrs. Margaret Olivia Sage in 1907 for “the improvement of social and living conditions in the United States.” RSF now carries out that mission by sponsoring rigorous social scientific research as a means of diagnosing social problems and improving social policies. In sponsoring this research, the Foundation is dedicated to strengthening the methods, data, and theoretical core of the social sciences. The Foundation’s awards are restricted to support for social science research within the following five program areas:

States of Care and Corruption

            Security check cleared, required entry permit in hand, I head to the Lower House building at the Jordanian Parliament to start my SSD-funded summer research on public discourse on corruption in Jordan since the late-1980's.  I find Rula, the last remaining librarian that day, a 17-year old who had started working there two months prior to her completing her high-school examination (General Certificate of Secondary Education).