Department of Anthropology

Lecture: In the Shadow of De-Industrialization // Rosalind C. Morris

Description: In the electrified world, the withdrawal of electricity may be experienced as a loss and a violence of the most profound sort, one that threatens to catapult those who must survive in its aftermath into something like a prehistorical state.  And yet, in the new ‘darkness,’ everything remains shaped—as would be a shadow—by the structures and forms of life that electrification made possible, including the forms by which it subsumed prior modes of existence.  This lecture explores such a situation in the de-industrializing spaces of South Africa’s gold economy.

Russell Sage Foundation's Special Initiative on Integrating Biology and Social Science Knowledge (BioSS)

The integration of biological and social science research is in its early years and the initial results are promising. Nevertheless, we believe it can best achieve its potential and have a positive impact if it develops through rigorous collaborative research generated by social and biological scientists.

Toxic Legacies of Mill Creek Ravine: Contested Landscapes of Industrialization and Colonialism in Western Canada

My dissertation examines the relationship between industrialization (the development of infrastructure, the standardization of commodities, and the development of a labouring class) and settler colonialism in the context of early twentieth-century meat-packing plants in Edmonton, Alberta. Turning beyond the florescence of meat-packing as a dominant industry in Edmonton (1900-1940s), my research tracks how different legacies from that period endure into the present both materially and as contested objects of discourse.

#TALKINGTRUMP: Conversation, Context, Controversy | Jan. 19 @ 5:30pm

Join us on the eve of Inauguration!

January 19, 5:30-7pm

Mandel Hall, Reynolds Club
1131 E 57th St, Chicago, IL 60637

 

What circumstances led to @realDonaldTrump winning the #2016election and what does his presidency mean? Join faculty experts from @UChicagoSocialScience for a panel discussion on the eve of the Presidential #Inauguration on what the #potus-elect represents now and moving forward. 

 

What is "hygge?" A Study in Scandinavia: Q&A with PhD Candidate Janet Connor

Oxford Dictionaries shortlisted the wildly popular and difficult to translate Danish word “hygge” for the 2016 word of the year. According to OD, it refers to “a quality of cosiness and comfortable conviviality that engenders a feeling of contentment or well-being (regarded as a defining characteristic of Danish culture).”