Department of Anthropology

NSF Archaeometry

The goal of the Archaeology Program is to fund research which furthers anthropologically relevant archaeological knowledge. In accordance with the National Science Foundation’s mission such research has the potential to provide fundamental scientific insight. While within the broad range of “archaeology” the focus is on projects judged to be significant from an anthropological perspective, the Program sets no priorities based on time period, geographic region or specific research topic. The Program administers four competitions each of which is described below.

NSF Archaeology - Senior Research

The goal of the Archaeology Program is to fund research which furthers anthropologically relevant archaeological knowledge. In accordance with the National Science Foundation’s mission such research has the potential to provide fundamental scientific insight. While within the broad range of “archaeology” the focus is on projects judged to be significant from an anthropological perspective, the Program sets no priorities based on time period, geographic region or specific research topic.

Rediscovering Dejima: My journey through early modern Japan’s window to the West

The little-known artificial island of Dejima often surprises people.  Though the “opening” of Japan to the West is popularly regarded as the arrival of American Commodore Perry’s steam-powered gunships at Tokyo Bay in 1853, Dejima proves Westerners were welcomed in Japan long before Perry.  Ever since I first learned of Dejima, I have been fascinated by this intriguing site that can expand our understanding of early global commerce from a non-colonial perspective.

Social Sciences Faculty Honored with 2014 Teaching Awards

Division of the Social Sciences faculty were honored for both undergraduate teaching and graduate teaching as part of the Llewellyn John and Harriet Manchester Quantrell Awards and the Faculty Awards for Excellence in Graduate Teaching and Mentoring. Overall, half of all awards were given to divisional faculty this year, a testament to their dedication to the classroom experience.

Studying Genomics as Science, Industry and Culture

My dissertation is an ethnographic study of frontier genomic culture in California. Genomic technologies promise rationalizing, predictive capacities. Beyond these aims, they produce new problems of interpretation and futures of variously implicated subjects. My project assesses how the biomedical and biometric assertions of genomics – such as medicine ‘personalized’ for individuals – play out vis-à-vis its everyday uses, values, and implications.

Anthropology professor Susan Gal receives faculty excellence award

Mae & Sidney G. Metzl Distinguished Service Professor of Anthropology, of Linguistics, and of Social Sciences in the College, Susan Gal has been selected to receive a 2013-2014 Faculty Award for Excellence in Graduate Teaching and Mentoring. This award honors faculty members for their achievements in classroom teaching and for their special contributions in encouraging the work of graduate students.